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Cock-a-doodle-doo!

That’s the traditional sound a rooster makes, but in the story Cock-a-Doodle-MOO!, the rooster makes a different sound. This story follows a little rooster who doesn’t want to get up early and take over the morning wake-up call while Daddy Rooster is away. Instead, he decides to trade chores with another animal on the farm.

While reading cock-a-doodle moo, there are many activities you can use to help students get involved in the book and extend their learning.

Practice Making Animal Sounds

Animal sounds are some of the first sounds kids learn to make. Even young toddlers can often tell you that a cow says “moo” and a lion says “roar.” However, that doesn’t mean older kids don’t like making animal sounds too. Before reading through the story, talk about the different sounds animals make. Focus on farm animals, such as sheep, cows, ducks, chickens, donkeys, pigs, horses, and roosters. As you read the story with kids, they’ll recognize many of these sounds.

Talk About Animal Jobs

Farmers don’t just have animals because they like them. Animals also play important roles on the farm. For example, cows produce milk, sheep provide wool, and horses and donkeys help with plowing the fields and carrying things around the farm. Talk to students about the different roles animals play on a farm and ask them to consider what would happen if animals switched roles. For example, what would happen if a pig decided to lay eggs? Not only will some of the scenarios get students to laugh, they’ll help them understand why the animals on the farm are important.

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Discuss Chores and Responsibilities

Just like the little rooster must take over for his father, kids have jobs they must do around the home and in the classroom. This story is a great way to start talking to students about their roles and responsibilities in the classroom. It also offers a great way to talk to students about their responsibilities at home. Consider questions such as:

  • What jobs do you have at home?
  • What jobs do you have at school?
  • What happens if you don’t do your job?

Find Rhyming Words

In a section of the story, little rooster goes through various versions of cock-a-doodle-doo, such as cock-a-doodle-shoo, cock-a-doodle-achoo, and cock-a-doodle-moo. Work with students to come up with other words that rhyme with “moo”. For example, glue, shoe, new, who, and boo. Kids may even use those words to come up with their own new version of Cock-a-doodle-moo. For example, maybe a ghost trades places with little rooster.

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After finding words that rhyme with cock-a-doodle-doo, pick out other words in the book that students can use to find more rhymes. For example, how many words can students think of that rhyme with pig or cow?

All of these activities will help kids become more engaged in the story and learn a little bit too.

 

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